PRIVACY POLICY

PRIVACY POLICY

The SIMA RAMA Privacy Policy is designed to help you understand how we collect and use the personal information you decide to share, and help you make informed decisions when using SIMA RAMA, located at https://simarama.club and its directly associated domains and social network presence (collectively, “SIMA RAMA” or “Website”).

By using or accessing SIMA RAMA, you are accepting the practices described in this Privacy Policy.

If you have questions or concerns regarding this statement, you should contact our privacy staff at welcome@simarama.club.

The Information We Collect

When you visit SIMA RAMA you provide us with two types of information: personal information you knowingly choose to disclose that is collected by us and Website use information collected by us as you interact with our Website.

When you register with SIMA RAMA, you provide us with certain personal information, such as your name, your email address, and any other personal or preference information that you provide to us.

When you enter SIMA RAMA, we collect your browser type and IP address. This information is gathered for all SIMA RAMA visitors. In addition, we store certain information from your browser using “cookies.” A cookie is a piece of data stored on the user’s computer tied to information about the user. We use session ID cookies to confirm that users are logged in. These cookies terminate once the user closes the browser. You can remove or block this cookie using the settings in your browser if you want to disable this convenience feature.

When you use SIMA RAMA, you may set up your personal profile, connect your Facebook account, make comments, and transmit information through various channels. We collect this information so that we can provide you the service and offer personalized features.

You post your own private or personal information on the Website at your own risk. Please be aware that no security measures are perfect or impenetrable. We cannot control the actions of other Users with whom you may choose to share your pages and information. Therefore, we cannot and do not guarantee that information you post on the Website will not be viewed by unauthorized persons. We are not responsible for circumvention of any privacy settings or security measures contained on the Website. You understand and acknowledge that, even after removal, copies of user information may remain viewable in cached and archived pages or if other Users have copied or stored your information.

If you choose to use our invitation service to tell a friend about our site, we will ask you for information needed to send the invitation, such as your friend’s email address. We will automatically send your friend a one-time email or instant message inviting him or her to visit the site. SIMA RAMA stores this information to send this one-time invitation, to register a friend connection if your invitation is accepted, and to track the success of our referral program. Your friend may contact us at welcome@simarama.club to request that we remove this information from our database.

By using SIMA RAMA, you are consenting to have your personal data transferred to the United States of America and processed.

Use of Information Obtained by SIMA RAMA

When you register with SIMA RAMA, you create your own profile and privacy settings. We may occasionally use your name and email address to send you notifications regarding new services offered by SIMA RAMA and other relevant SIMA programs that we think you may find valuable.

Profile information is used by SIMA RAMA primarily to be presented back to and edited by you when you access the service.

SIMA RAMA will send you service-related announcements from time to time through the general operation of the service. Generally, you may opt out of such emails by contacting welcome@simarama.club, though SIMA RAMA reserves the right to send you notices about your account even if you opt out of all voluntary email notifications.

SIMA RAMA may use information in your profile without identifying you as an individual to third parties. We do this for purposes such as aggregating how many people in a network like a movie and personalizing advertisements and promotions so that we can provide you with SIMA RAMA

We may use information about you that we collect from other sources, including but not limited to Social Network Platforms where we have a presence, newspapers and Internet sources such as blogs, instant messaging services, Social Network Platform developers and other users of SIMA RAMA, to supplement your profile. Where such information is used, we generally allow you to specify that you do not want this to be done or to take other actions that limit the connection of this information to your profile.

Legal basis for handling information

Legitimate interests: In many cases, we handle personal data on the ground that it furthers our legitimate interests in ways that are not overridden by the interests or fundamental rights and freedoms of the affected individuals. This includes:

    • Providing a safe and enjoyable user experience
    • Constituent service
    • Marketing, e.g. sending emails or other communications to let you know about new products, events, and services
    • Protecting our users, personnel, and property
    • Analyzing and improving our websites and services, e.g. collecting information about how you use our services to optimize the design and placement of certain features
    • Managing legal issues
  • Legal compliance: We need to use and disclose personal data in certain ways to comply with our legal obligations.
  • Consent: Where required by law, and in some other cases, we handle personal data on the basis of your implied or express consent.

Sharing Your Information with Third Parties

We do not provide contact information to third party marketers without your permission. We share your information with third parties only in limited circumstances where we believe such sharing is 1) reasonably necessary to offer the service, 2) legally required or, 3) permitted by you. When you use SIMA RAMA, certain information you post or share with third parties (e.g., a friend or someone in your network), such as personal information, comments, messages, listings or other information, may be shared with other users in accordance with the privacy settings you select. All such sharing of information is done at your own risk. Please keep in mind that if you disclose personal information in your profile or when posting comments, messages, listings or other items , this information may become publicly available.

Links

SIMA RAMA may contain links to other websites or be accessed through other websites. We are of course not responsible for the privacy practices of other web sites. We encourage our users to be aware when they leave our site to read the privacy statements of each and every web site that collects personally identifiable information. This Privacy Policy applies solely to information collected by SIMA RAMA.

Changing or Removing Information

Access and control over most personal information on SIMA RAMA is readily available through the profile editing tools. SIMA RAMA users may modify or delete any of their profile information at any time by logging into their account and visiting https://simarama.club/membership-account/. Information will be updated immediately. Individuals who wish to deactivate their SIMA RAMA account may do so on their account page. Removed information may persist in backup copies for a reasonable period of time but will not be generally available to members of SIMA RAMA.

Where you make use of the communication features of the service to share information with SIMA RAMA, however, (e.g., sending a panel question or action suggestion) you cannot remove such communications. If you would like to request access to your information, request your information be deleted, or sent to you or a third party, please contact us at welcome@simarama.club.

Security

SIMA RAMA takes appropriate precautions to protect our users’ information. Your account information is located on a secured server behind a firewall. When you enter sensitive information (such as your password), we encrypt that information using secure socket layer technology (SSL). (To learn more about SSL, go to http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Secure_Sockets_Layer). Because email and instant messaging are not recognized as secure communications, we request that you not send private information to us by email or instant messaging services.

Terms of Use, Notices and Revisions

Your use of SIMA RAMA, and any disputes arising from it, is subject to this Privacy Policy and all of its dispute resolution provisions including arbitration, limitation on damages and choice of law. We reserve the right to change our Privacy Policy at any time. Non-material changes and clarifications will take effect immediately, and material changes will take effect within 30 days of their posting on this site. If we make changes, we will post them and will indicate at the top of this page the policy’s new effective date. If we make material changes to this policy, we will notify you here, by email, or through notice on our home page. We encourage you to refer to this policy on an ongoing basis so that you understand our current privacy policy. Unless stated otherwise, our current privacy policy applies to all information that we have about you and your account.

Your data rights

You can unsubscribe from certain emails by clicking the “unsubscribe” link they contain. You can opt out from certain cookie-related processing by changing the proper settings in your browser. Individuals in the European Economic Area, Canada, Costa Rica and some other jurisdictions outside the United States have certain legal rights to obtain confirmation of whether we hold personal data about them, to access personal data we hold about them, and to obtain its correction, update, amendment, or deletion in appropriate circumstances. They may also object to our uses or disclosures of personal data, to request a restriction on its processing, or withdraw any consent, though such actions typically will not have retroactive effect. They also will not affect our ability to continue processing data in lawful ways.

Contacting the Web Site

If you have any questions about this privacy policy, please contact us at welcome@simarama.club. You may also contact us by mail at 632 Westbourne Drive, Los Angeles CA 90069.

 

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  • Patagonia Action Works connects committed individuals to organizations working on environmental issues in the same community. It’s now possible for anyone to discover and connect with environmental action groups and get involved with the work they do.
  • Conscious businesses and companies: https://bcorporation.net/
  • Organizations working on environmental justice and climate action:

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  • Host a Screening of Elemental in your Community
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  • Reporters without borders – Promotes and defends freedom of information and freedom of the press.
  • Sahar Speaks – Produces high-quality journalism from Afghan female correspondents in a global media outlet.
  • Freedom Of The Press Foundation –  Helping support and defend public-interest journalism focused on exposing mismanagement, corruption, and lawbreaking in government.
  • The Op Ed ProjectIncreasing the range of voices and quality of ideas we hear in the world.  A starting goal is to

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  • Host a Screening of Frame by Frame in your Community
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  • Advocate for SDG#16: Peace and Justice and SDG #5: Gender Equality and and Women’s Empowerment
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Filmmaker Interview with Director Mo Scarpelli

 Farzana Wahidy, FRAME BY FRAME, Production Still

 

After decades of war and an oppressive Taliban regime, four Afghan photojournalists face the realities of building a free press in a country left to stand on its own — reframing Afghanistan for the world and for themselves.

When the Taliban ruled Afghanistan, taking a photo was a crime. After the regime fell from power in 2001, a fledgling free press emerged and a photography revolution was born. Now, as foreign troops and media withdraw, Afghanistan is left to stand on its own, and so are its journalists. Set in a modern Afghanistan bursting with color and character, FRAME BY FRAME follows four Afghan photojournalists as they navigate an emerging and dangerous media landscape — reframing Afghanistan for the world, and for themselves. Through cinema vérité, intimate interviews, powerful photojournalism, and never-before-seen archival footage shot in secret during the Taliban regime, the film connects audiences with four humans in the pursuit of the truth.

FRAME BY FRAME Directors, Alexandria Bombach (left) and Mo Scarpelli (right)

What motivated you to make this film?

[Mo Scarpelli] In 2012, we traveled to Afghanistan in search of a story about perception — how and why do we form our perceptions of a country at war? And how does this intersect what is actually happening on the ground? In Kabul, we met four incredible local photojournalists. They are deeply embedded in the past, present, and future of their country, and their own truths inform their will to take ownership of Afghanistan’s story and reveal a humanness that is rarely captured by foreign media.

We knew that their stories could bridge what often feels like an insurmountable divide between Afghans and Western audiences.

The world is hankering for a more in-depth and honest view of life in today’s Afghanistan and the issues Afghans face as they stand on their own to rebuild the country. We also knew that this story couldn’t be more timely. Right now, the future of Afghanistan is mired in uncertainty. The government has just transitioned power to a new president. U.S. security forces are pulling out, foreign media is shuttering bureaus, and aid — which helped jumpstart Afghanistan’s free press movement — is dwindling. After more than 13 years of historical growth, free press stands as one of Afghanistan’s most viable hopes for political and social stability. Now is the time to shed light on the realities of building free press in a country whose future may depend on it.

What are a few memorable takeaways from your experience making this film?

So many! Production was an incredible experience. The photographers were very open with us and understood (as storytellers themselves) what we wanted to do. They trusted us, which is an immense privilege. Afghanistan’s golden light, beautiful scenery and colorful streets made it easy on us — everywhere we went, we found inspiration to make a beautiful film. Post-production was very difficult at times, because we put a lot of pressure on ourselves to do the subjects’ stories justice… but it was then so rewarding to find an audience connecting deeply with them when the film was done. One of the most amazing things was when the four photographers visited the US for several festivals, and we got to know them as friends. This was a life-changing time for everyone involved.

Is your story what you thought it would be–how did it evolve from day one, to the very last day in post?

Everything changes all the time! But we knew from the start this had to be a story about human beings, and tapping into who they are, giving a very deep and honest glimpse of their experience. That notion remained throughout every stage of the process.

Any developments since releasing FRAME BY FRAME?

We have recently screened the film for the President of Afghanistan, along with the US Embassy, National Press Club and other institutions with decision-making power for free press issues — the reactions have been incredibly visceral and we are hoping the film stays with those who work on protecting local journalists anywhere in the world. There’s also an update at the end of the film on what the subjects are working on.

If you could narrow it down, what’s one film that has inspired your filmmaking career most?

ONLY THE YOUNG

What’s your favorite part about the filmmaking process?

Surprises. Everything goes ‘wrong’ in documentary in that nothing pans out the way you may have thought it would. But when you see that as an opportunity to shift the story or make the obstacles a part of the story, and when you trust it will turn out fine, it’s a sweet wild ride.

What did you shoot on?

Canon 5D, a little with the Canon C300. We needed a reliable work-horse camera, light-weight and easy to move quickly with. Also, the subjects of the film use the same / similar cameras, so we could blend in with them + other photographers in the press pool, etc. while shooting with the 5D.

What were a few stylistic choices or techniques that you used to help tell your story?

We wanted to make a beautiful, cinematic film — we had never seen a documentary that captured the immense beauty of the country before. So, it was important to us to take our time, be diligent and intention in the cinematography. We were inspired by and to try our best to create images that would even come close to the incredible photography of the subjects in the film.

What’s one item you always take with you when shooting out in the field?

Quarters… great tripod key!

What advice can you give to other impact filmmakers?

Go for it!

Filmmaker Interview with Producer Mark Weber

What motivated you to make this film?

Our director Michael Matheson Miller has a very interesting background with a masters in philosophy, a masters in international business in Europe, and a masters in international development in Japan. In this film, you see those three fields come together. Michael was discouraged by the social engineering mindset embedded in international development, feeling that the people we label “the poor” were being treated as objects with categorical programming that failed to appreciate the creative capacity and destiny of the individual person. That philosophical anthropology that each human person is endowed with dignity
and creative potential is the starting point of the film’s analysis.

My own awakening to this objectification of “the poor” came in 2008 in a tribal village in Bangladesh. I was the captain of the Notre Dame Boxing Team, which since 1931 has been supporting the Catholic missions there. Our motto was “Strong bodies fight, that weak bodies may be nourished.” We used it in all of our promotion with stock photos of Bangladesh and everyone praised us for fighting for such a great cause. In the 78 years before the 2008 trip I organized, no students had ever actually been to Bangladesh because of the extreme conditions and wars there. But there we were, finally, visiting a girls’ school and listening to a Bengali priest explain who we were. “These are the Notre Dame boxers, and we are very thankful to them for supporting us for many years so you can go to school. They have a beautiful motto: Strong bodies fight, and they are the strong bodies,” he gestured to us. “So that weak bodies may be nourished, and we are the weak bodies,” he completed slowly gesturing to the girls, realizing the strangeness of what he said only as it came out of his mouth. The young women looked confused. We felt an intense discomfort and sank in our chairs, hit in the face with the embedded paternalism in our most prized motto. “Na,” one of the girls declared verbally. We are not weak. I will never forget that moment. It changed my mindset from that day forward and inspired me to be a part of this film.

 

Can you describe any obstacles you encountered in making your film and/or in your distribution/exhibition efforts?

Distribution is a real challenge because it is an ever-changing landscape and there is no one way of doing it. By the time a book is written on the subject, it’s already out of date. Our strategy involved playing the film as many places as we could. No festival was too small and it so happened that our educational and international agreement with Ro*Co Films, came from playing at the Topanga Film Festival (a person there was friends with a person at Ro*Co). We also contacted as many filmmakers as we could, interviewed them, and took careful notes on how they did distribution. Each film was different, but understanding the many possibilities helped us craft a strategy and execution plan best fit for our film.

 

What do you want audiences to take away from your film?

The title of our film is a bit of a tip-of-the-hat to one of our favorite films, FOOD, INC. That film concludes with an interview with a Walmart buyer. A decade ago, no one thought Walmart would be carrying organics. But consumers “voted” for organics in the marketplace, thus compelling Walmart to respond. This is the dollar democracy of the market economy at work.

I hope people join us in our own educational process of shifting from paternalism to partnership. We need to take that charitable desire to help others and integrate it vertically  through everything we do, not just silo it in a separate category we call philanthropy, charity, or corporate social responsibility. We need to vote for companies, nonprofits, and government leaders that treat people as persons with potential, not as the objects of our compassion.

Practically speaking, this means we don’t donate to nonprofits that are perpetuating paternalism through their models and marketing. It means we buy from companies that manufacture their products and source their materials ethically, or are at least deeply committed to improving this transparency year over year. It means we vote for leaders that uphold the institutions of justice that allow people to flourish – property rights, rule of law, and freedom.

 

Please list key points that should be covered in a post-screening discussion:

We encourage audiences to frame their discussions with the understanding that this documentary is “open-source.” It’s not designed as a closed argument that tells you what you’re supposed to do next. “What can I do?” is a question we often hear. While we appreciate the desire to help, the question itself is also representative of how stuck we are in one-size-fits-all solutions. You are unique. We couldn’t possibly portend to know what your unique path is to making the most of your talents. Our goal is to give you an interpretive key, a decoder, a way of looking at the world. Your responsibility is to use that decoder to look inside you and to look around you for opportunities to apply yourself and your principles consistently, effectively, passionately.

Specifically one thing we want to remember is that this film is not a condemnation of charity. It’s aimed at redeeming the true meaning of charity. We’ve made charity synonymous with writing a check to a cause. True charity – caritas – is a deep form of interpersonal love, where you look into the eyes of a unique person and see him or her in the fullness of who that person is. Being charitable is much more about our time and daily interactions than it is about the deductions on our tax forms. It’s time to redeem this word
by bringing attention to how much we have cheapened it.

 

Please provide information on any recent developments regarding the issue or subjects of the film. How have things changed or not changed?

This September, the Millennium Development Goals are up for renewal and they’re being redrafted as the Sustainable Development Goals. I personally believe they are a distraction from what’s really important. Policies like the U.S. Farm Bill and the Trans-Pacific Partnership are much more relevant. Furthermore, I fear the more active and well-funded the Sustainable Development Goals are, the more harm they might do. As an example, the Haitian earthquake relief was an unmitigated disaster, fraught with corruption and
incompetence that delayed Haiti’s recovery. See the NPR and HBO Vice pieces on this. Relief is an appropriate intervention for wealthy countries to make, yet we fail. If we cannot be successful with basic relief, why do we believe we can succeed in the infinitely more complicated process of development? Development is organic. It can’t be manufactured. Can you grow a hamburger in a petri dish? Yes. But is it a viable way to create food. No. And it never will be.

 

What opportunities are available for those interested in getting further involved?
Again, keeping in mind that the film is an interpretive key and there is intentionally no “donate here” button, a few ideas:
If you’re interested in law, maybe you can volunteer your time as a legal advocate to protect people’s property rights, help them navigate the legal system to be productive, and most of all, help find ways to incrementally improve legal systems and regulations that weigh people down unnecessarily.

If you’re interested in business and entrepreneurship, vertically integrate your ethos throughout your entire supply chain. Ti voglio bene, the Italians say. I will your good. This is what the actions of 21st Century business leaders should communicate to consumers, suppliers, employees, investors, and even rivals, whose competition drives innovation forward for all.

If you’re interested in nonprofits, consider the fact that you are still part of the marketplace of value exchange. Your donors give you money in exchange for good work they expect you to do. Be very aware of the pitfall intrinsic to such an exchange: the feedback loop between the donor and the end-user (the person you are trying to help) is broken. The instinct of every organization is to survive and perpetuate itself. Be wary of this as it relates to how and why you go about your work.

If you’re interested in donating, consider adopting an integrated understanding of your dollars. Don’t separate out your charitable spending and the rest of your spending. Spend consciously and intentionally in accordance with your values. Consider spending more of your time building relationships that aren’t solely predicated on you helping someone from a position of power. Sometimes people just need someone to look them in the eye and treat them as a person. Don’t give a million dollars to a foundation then never stop to talk to someone on the street. Even if you don’t give that person a dime, give that person the respect of looking them in the eye.

If you’re interested in policy, consider the words of Juan Jose Daboub, a former World Bank official from El Salvador. “We looked at many countries that had had comparable experiences, either because of some sort of war or civil strife, or for some kind of natural disaster. We looked at Chile, and we looked at countries that after World War II were totally destroyed. South Korea came into the picture, but also Australia, New Zealand, Hong Kong, Taiwan. These were countries that had one thing in common: they removed obstacles for people to be able to take destiny to their own hands, and we wanted to emulate that. We wanted to change the role of the government from one of an orchestra director to one of a referee that addresses, that helps resolve the controversy among the different actors in society, but that do not have to over-intervene in people’s life. This was the basic thing that El Salvador was able to accomplish.”

 

Please provide any additional resources (websites, links to additional videos, forms, articles, etc.):
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